EAC Health Facts

Environmental & Health Consequences of Dog Poop

• The EPA (Environmental Protection Agency in the States) deemed pet waste a “nonpoint source of pollution” in 1991, which put dog feces in the same category as oil and toxic chemicals!

• Dog feces are NOT a good fertilizer for grass. It is actually toxic, causing burns and unsightly discoloring.

• It has been estimated that a single gram of dog waste can contain 23 million fecal coliform bacteria, which are known to cause cramps, diarrhea, intestinal illness, and severe kidney disorders in humans. The EPA even estimates that two or three days’ worth of droppings from a population of about 100 dogs would contribute enough bacteria to temporarily close a bay and all watershed areas within 20 miles of it to swimming and shell fishing.

• Dog feces are one the most common carriers of the following diseases:

Heartworms Tapeworms
Whipworms Roundworms
Parvo Corona
Salmonellosis Giardiasis
Cryptosporidiosis Campylobacteriosis
Hookworms  


• Picking up dog waste reduces flies and their lifecycle. The same flies that lay their eggs in dog waste can then come into our homes and spread diseases as they pause on our counters and our food. Reducing dog feces reduces fly prevalence. 

• Picking up dog waste reduces flies and their lifecycle. The same flies that lay their eggs in dog waste can then come into our homes and spread diseases as they pause on our counters and our food. Reducing dog feces reduces fly prevalence. 

• Believe it or not, dogs will eat their own feces. While most dog owners think this doesn’t apply to their dogs, the truth is that most dogs will engage in this unsavory practice at some point in their lives. Dogs evolved as carnivores/scavengers and feces were considered fair game in lean times. To prevent this occasional indiscretion from becoming a life-long habit, feces should be cleaned up as soon as possible, especially in young dogs where the problem is most prevalent.

• There is a tremendous amount of information including scientific documentation of the harmful effect of dog feces available on the internet.


Eutrophication (Nutrient Pollution) Did you know?

Spring Lake is known as a ‘seepage lake’ and lakes such as ours are typical in this area. These bodies of water have no surface water inflows or outflows. Most water comes from groundwater flow; springs in our case. Spring Lake, like many lakes in Alberta, is what is called a ‘eutrophic lake’. Lakes become eutrophic in a natural process as the lake ages and becomes more productive. This normally takes thousands of years to occur. We as humans, through our various cultural activities have greatly accelerated the eutrophication process in thousands of lakes around the world.

Read the PDF attached for the complete article on Eutrophication in Spring Lake.

site
Version 5.3
Site Map | Login | Powered By: Techweavers Inc.